Conversations On Depression





This page provides resources, talking points, conversation starters, etc. on the topic of depression and bipolar disorder.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline:
(800) 273-8255

The more we talk about it in society, the more we normalize it. The more we normalize it, the more we end the stigma. When the stigma is gone, real help can be found.

If you’ve got something to add, please let me know in the comments section and I’ll get it up as soon as I can.


From Facebook:

“This guy’s walking down the street when he falls in a hole. The walls are so steep he can’t get out. A doctor passes by and the guy shouts up, ‘Hey you. Can you help me out?’ The doctor writes a prescription, throws it down in the hole and moves on. Then a priest comes along and the guy shouts up, ‘Father, I’m down in this hole can you help me out?’ The priest writes out a prayer, throws it down in the hole and moves on. Then a friend walks by, ‘Hey, Joe, it’s me can you help me out?’ And the friend jumps in the hole. Our guy says, ‘Are you stupid? Now we’re both down here.’ The friend says, ‘Yeah, but I’ve been down here before and I know the way out.'”


From Facebook:

My newsfeed is filled with notes about Robin Williams. I really don’t have any words. He was an inspiration to me in so many ways. The way in which he left us is tragic and I can only hope that it can further open the door for a true discussion on mental health in this country. Depression doesn’t care if you’re rich, poor, tall, short, married, single, employed, jobless or any other way. So if someone tells you that they are depressed, I beg of you, please do not say, “Why are YOU depressed? You have X, Y and Z going for you.” Telling someone who has been brave enough to open up about this horrible horrible monster that they don’t have a reason to be depressed just furthers the fears of talking openly about it. Depression doesn’t need a reason to appear. To people on the outside, Robin Williams probably seemed like the last person to be battling depression, since he could always make us laugh, he must be happy, right? Oh what a great mask comedy can be. Please be gentle with yourself. Be gentle with each other. And never be afraid to ask someone if they are okay. You never know what a difference it can make. Thank you to those who have asked me.


From Facebook:

You’d never ask someone why they have cancer, they just do. Depression needs to be thought of the same way.


From Facebook:

A man has cancer. His cancer means he lives each day in pain and anguish. The man spent a long time fighting his cancer, he fought it with everything he had – he worked with his doctors, tried several different treatment regimens, made significant lifestyle changes.

Treatment didn’t work. The man is in pain, he’s suffering, and he has no fight left.

If this man chooses to end his suffering, no one holds it against him. Everyone understands and finds some comfort knowing that at least he’s not suffering anymore.

A man has depression and bipolar disorder. His depression means he lives each day in pain and anguish. The man spent a long time fighting his depression, he fought it with everything he had – he worked with his doctors, tried several different treatment regimens, made significant lifestyle changes.

Treatment didn’t work. The man is in pain, he’s suffering, and he has no fight left.

But when this man chooses to end his suffering, some people call it selfish and weak. Some people blame him and hold it against him.

Some people expected him to continue living every day in anguish and suffering, without a cure.

I don’t understand this double standard.


From Facebook:

Part of the problem we face when we talk about suicide is the word itself – to call something a suicide implies that it’s the same thing as all other acts called suicide.

That’s not true. Not all suicides are the same. We can’t assume we understand the act simply because we’ve named it this generic term. We must look at the person, at their life and circumstances.


From “Little Bee” by Chris Cleave:

Five days later he killed himself by hanging. They found my husband with his feet treading empty air, touching the soil of no country. Death, of course, is a refuge. It’s where you go when a new name, or a mask and cape, can no longer hide you from yourself. It’s where you can run to when none of the principalities of your conscience will grant you asylum.


I Fucking Love Science

“The Science of Depression” – http://www.iflscience.com/brain/science-depression

“Brains, Genes And Chemical Imbalances – How Explanations Of Mental Illness Affect Stigma” – http://www.iflscience.com/brain/brains-genes-and-chemical-imbalances-%E2%80%93-how-explanations-mental-illness-affect-stigma


The Bloggess

http://thebloggess.com/2014/01/strange-and-beautiful/

http://thebloggess.com/

One of the internet’s most popular comedic bloggers (and sex writer)


Hyperbole and a Half

http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2011/10/adventures-in-depression.html

http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2013/05/depression-part-two.html

http://www.hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/

Blog/Comic from a brilliantly honest writer.


AnnalouX

“My Sister’s Smile” – http://www.annaloux.com/1/post/2014/06/my-sisters-smile.html

Account of two siblings working through depression to repair their relationship.


Everyday Health: Sanity Break

“What I Wish People Knew About Depression” – http://www.everydayhealth.com/columns/therese-borchard-sanity-break/what-i-wish-people-knew-about-depression/

Article listing things people without depression should know about people with depression.


Let’s Queer Things Up!

“Amanda Bynes, Robin Williams and the Spectacle of Mental Illness” – http://letsqueerthingsup.com/2014/10/16/its-all-fun-and-games-until-someone-dies-amanda-bynes-robin-williams-and-the-spectacle-of-mental-illness/

Article that actually treats Amanda Bynes like – surprise – a human being.


 

The Next Web (c/o Medium)

“Startups: Let’s talk about depression” – http://thenextweb.com/lifehacks/2015/03/08/startups-lets-talk-about-depression/

Article about opening up the conversation on depression in tech startups and the culture of “killing it all the time.”


 

The Next Web (c/o Crew blog)

“How to ask for help (and not feel bad about it)” – http://thenextweb.com/lifehacks/2014/08/01/need-help-just-ask/

Article about asking for help – why we don’t do it and how, specifically, to ask directly for help from people.


 

Facebook Page: Depression Recovery Groups

https://www.facebook.com/DepressionRecoveryGroups

Facebook page full of great links and resources. 


Project Helping

http://www.projecthelping.org/

“Our mission is to end the stigma associated with depression.”


National Suicide Prevention Lifeline:
(800) 273-8255

Robin Williams - Your Move, Chief

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